Recipes from the HSCG 2017 conference: Niacinamide & willow bark hydro-gel – part three, the recipe and modifications

Yesterday, we met a new gelling agent in the form of Sepinov EMT 10, and Monday we took a look at the ingredients we're using in this recipe. Today, let's look at the recipe and some modifications we can make to it!

NIACINAMIDE & WILLOW BARK OIL FREE MOISTURIZER (HYDRO-GEL)
WATER PHASE
74.5% distilled water
5% willow bark extract (liquid)
4% niacinamide (powder)
3% propanediol 1,3
3% sea kelp bioferment
2% n-acetyl glucosamine
2% panthenol (powder)
2% chamomile extract (liquid)
0.5% sodium lactate (powder)
0.5% allantoin
0.5% liquid Germall Plus

EMT PHASE
3.0 % Sepinov EMT 10

In a container that’s big enough to use the stick blender or hand mixer in, combine all the water phase ingredients. Sprinkle the powder over the water, then mix well with a stick blender or hand mixer until it gels. You’re done! Rejoice!

Wow, that was super easy, right? 

If you want to alter this recipe, please note that niacinamide needs to have a pH around 6, so we can’t add any acids, like salicylic acid or AHAs, or ingredients that might need to have a lower pH. 

A few combinations that might be nice…
Use this as a targeted treatment by adding 3% to 10% argireline into the water phase. 
Try using this as a targeted or all over treatment by dissolving 1% genistein into 3% glycerin (use in place of the propanediol 1,3). 
5% Fision Active White for a little of everything to help with skin brightening. 
Add 10% any oil or oil soluble ingredient to this recipe to make a cream gel. I really like squalane in this recipe. (I'll be posting that version shortly...) 
Add a fruit acid complex at up to 10% to add some AHA ingredients. If you do this, please remove the niacinamide at 4% from the recipe as per my note above. 

If you have Sepimax ZEN, you can use it in place of Sepinov EMT 10 in this recipe. It may be quite thick at 3%, but give it a try. 

Or join me tomorrow and the next day as we look at some awesome modifications of this recipe! 

Links to buy these ingredients at Lotioncrafter:
Willow bark extract
Panthenol
Chamomile extract
Sodium lactate
Niacinamide
n-acetyl glucosamine
Propanediol 1,3
Sea kelp bioferment
Sepinov EMT 10
Allantoin
Liquid Germall Plus

Please note, I supply these links to Lotioncrafter as my thanks for sponsoring my demonstration at the HSCG conference. These are not affiliate links and I receive nothing if you click through or if you buy ingredients from that shop. I have them here to make it easier for you to find things as well as showing my gratitude for Jen's generosity! 

If you're interested in learning more about gels using Sepinov EMT 10 and simply can't wait for me to post things on this blog, please check out the e-zine I wrote on the topic, entitled Gels! Ooey, gooey fun! which includes recipes for Ultrez 20 and Sepimax ZEN. 

Oh, as a note, if you're a $10 subscriber to my Patreon page, Lotioncrafter is offering you a 7% discount on ingredients until Saturday, June 10th! Pretty awesome, eh?

Join me tomorrow for more fun modifying this recipe! 
Continue Reading

Recipes from the HSCG 2017 conference: Niacinamide & willow bark hydro-gel – part two, all about Sepinov EMT 10

In yesterday's post, we took a look at the ingredients to create a hydrating and oil free recipe with niacinamide and willow bark. Today, let's take a look at this new gelling agent and what it offers.

I’m using Sepinov EMT 10 as my gelling agent (INCI: Hydroxyethyl Acrylate / Sodium Acryloyldimethyl Taurate Copolymer). It's a pre-neutralized polymer you can use to make gels, cream gels, and alcoholic gels, and can be added to an emulsion as a rheology modifier (thickener).

The recommended usage rate is 0.5% to 5%. The lower usage rate is for including it in lotion, while the higher levels are creating gels or cream gels where EMT 10 is the main ingredient.

Why use this instead of another gelling agent? Because it’s not like normal gels. It can make a perfectly fine thick gel, but it’s awesome for making things like facial sera thanks to its silky skin feel. If we think of gels as being bouncy and watery, EMT 10 makes gels that are smooth, only slightly bouncy, and less watery than a normal gel. I’ve yet to make a clear gel with it, but that’s no big deal when you’ve made something lovely and moisturizing.

It’s an anionic or negatively charged ingredient, so it’s not compatible with cationic or positively charged ingredients. This means you can’t add cationic polymers like honeyquat, polyquat 44, polyquat 7, and so on, as well as emulsifiers like Incroquat BTMS-50, Rita BTMS-225, and so on. Some hydrolyzed proteins might be right out, too, so if you want to include those, do a test batch to see how they turn out.

To make a gel, add it to the water phase, then mix with a hand or stick mixer. As you’ll see in my recipes, I get all my ingredients into the container, then add Sepinov EMT 10 last and mix very well. The gel will be ready in minutes.

To make an alcoholic gel – inedible, sadly – you add all your water ingredients, then Sepinov EMT 10, then your alcohol while mixing. This might seem like a strange idea, but this is how you could make something like salicylic acid, which is soluble in water, or hand sanitizers.

For a cream gel, which is one with oils, add it to the oil phase, then add the entire water phase while mixing. The data sheets for this product say it can handle up to 50% oils, but that didn’t work for me. I tried 40% and 45% oils and esters, and each time had an epic fail. I suggest no more than 10% oils, esters, and oil soluble ingredients at first and see how it works for you. I liked 10% - you’ll see that shortly – and thought it was lovely and moisturizing.

To use it in a lotion as a thickener and rheology modifier, add to the heated oil phase. Remember, you can’t use it with Incroquat BTMS-50 or other positively charged emulsifiers.

As an aside, the reason we add powders to the heated oil phase is to make sure they don’t clump when we get them into the water phase. I know it seems counterintuitive, especially when you see it for ingredients that are really water soluble, like our carbomers and gums, but it really works! 

Since EMT 10 is stable from pH 3 to 10, it can be used in more acidic products, like those with AHAs or salicylic acid. It’s a great ingredient for facial products – I especially like spot treatments, eye products, and sera – thanks to that silky skin feel and ability to emulsify oils. The recommended usage rate is 0.5% to 5%. The lower usage rate is for including it in lotion, while the higher levels are creating gels or cream gels where EMT 10 is the main ingredient.

It’s an anionic or negatively charged ingredient, so it’s not compatible with cationic or positively charged ingredients. This means you can’t add cationic polymers like honeyquat, polyquat 44, polyquat 7, and so on, as well as emulsifiers like Incroquat BTMS-50, Rita BTMS-225, and so on. Some hydrolyzed proteins might be right out, too, so if you want to include those, do a test batch to see how they turn out.

Sepinov EMT 10 is a silky feeling gellant when compared to carbomers like pre-neutralized sodium carbomer, Ultrez 20, or Sepimax ZEN. You can use those gellants in this recipe instead of EMT 10 at their suggested usage rates. It can emulsify oils – I’ve found it’s best at 10% or so – and it can handle acids, like alpha-hydroxy acids, fruit acid extracts, lactic acid, glycolic acid, salicylic acid, and more.

You can buy Sepinov EMT 10 at Lotioncrafter!

Please note, I supply these links to Lotioncrafter as my thanks for sponsoring my demonstration at the HSCG conference. These are not affiliate links and I receive nothing if you click through or if you buy ingredients from that shop. I have them here to make it easier for you to find things as well as showing my gratitude for Jen's generosity! 

Join me tomorrow and we'll finish up this recipe!

Oh, as a note, if you're a $10 subscriber to my Patreon page, Lotioncrafter is offering you a 7% discount on ingredients until Saturday, June 10th! Pretty awesome, eh?

Final note, if you're interested in learning more about gels using Sepinov EMT 10 and simply can't wait for me to post things on this blog, please check out the e-zine I wrote on the topic, entitled Gels! Ooey, gooey fun! which includes recipes for Ultrez 20 and Sepimax ZEN. 
Continue Reading

Recipes from the 2017 HSCG conference – Niacinamide & Willow Bark Hydro-gel (part one)

Some skin types can’t handle oils, so this recipe is an oil free moisturizer or serum into which you could add all kinds of lovely water soluble ingredients. My goal for this product is to hydrate skin, help reduce inflammation, soothe irritated skin, and promote a more even skin tone.

I’m using willow bark extract in this recipe as it contains salicylic acid, which can help with problem skin and act as a chemical exfoliant. As much as I like saliyclic acid, it's hard to dissolve and can be a little much for some skin types.

You could use salicylic acid in this recipe dissolved in alcohol, for instance, as Sepinov EMT 10 can create alcoholic gels. You'll see some recipes including salcylic acid on the blog over the summer. 

I’m having a love affair with the combination of niacinamide (Vitamin B3) and n-acetyl glucosamine (NAG).

Used at as little as 2%, niacinamide can increase skin’s barrier lipids and ceramides, which results in a reduction of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and an increase in collagen synthesis. It can reduce sebum production and pore diameter, as well as reducing hyperpigmentation of age and sun spots. It can reduce the damage from environmental causes, which reduces the irritation, inflammation, and skin redness from things like the sun, cold, or weather as well as application of straight SLS.  Even at 5%, there's a lack of irritation and redness on our faces ('cause sometimes niacin can make our skin flush, but not at 2% or 5%). It can reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles and decreases skin blotchiness and "pebbling" or roughness on facial skin. It also behaves as an anti-inflammatory and enhances skin's barrier functions.

n-acetyl glucosamine is a bio-identical ingredient that can reduce hyperpigmentation in the skin, and has been shown to work well when combined with niacinamide. It can also increase hydration of our skin by increasing the production of hyaluronic acid in our skin. This combination has been studied and found to reduce the appearance of hyperpigmentation to promote a more uniform skin tone. Whew! That’s a lot of stuff, eh?

Propanediol 1,3 is a naturally derived substitute for propylene glycol that can be used at up to 20% in your water phase. It's a humectant that draws water from the atmosphere to your skin to offer hydration. It has a 9 to 12 month shelf life once opened.

I'm using it in this rcipe as a non-sticky feeling humectant. You could use glycerin or propylene glycol in its place, if you wished. 

I’m adding sea kelp bioferment to the recipe as my film former. (Gels don’t tend to like hydrolyzed proteins, so I’m using this ingredient to behave the way something like hydrolyzed oat protein might work.)

I’m adding panthenol to this gel to improve hydration of my skin, and sodium lactate to act as a humectant. (Yeah, I’ve gone crazy with humectants in this recipe, but I need something to moisturize and hydrate without oils!) I’m adding allantoin at 0.5% as my barrier protectant and skin soother, and I’m adding liquid chamomile extract to help reduce transepidermal water loss and soothe irritated skin.

Quick note: If you're using a liquid sodium lactate, you can use 1% in this recipe. If you're using the powder, please use no more than 0.5% sodium lactate. I made that error, and the viscosity was ruined!

If you haven't noticed by now that I love the combination of panthenol at 2%, allantoin at 0.5%, and some kind of hydrolyzed protein or film former at 2%, where have you been? I love this combination! I'm adding niacinamide at 4% and NAG at 2% to that combination these days, and my skin is so happy! As usual, your mileage may vary. 

As this post is getting far too long, please join me tomorrow for more information on Sepinov EMT 10 and the rest of this recipe!

As I've mentioned previously, my presentation at the conference was sponsored by Lotioncrafter, and you can get all the supplies for these products there. These are not affiliate links and I get nothing if you click through and buy something. I provide them as a thank you to Jen at Lotioncrafter for supplying everything necessary to do the presentation and more! 

Links to buy these ingredients at Lotioncrafter:
Willow bark extract
Panthenol
Chamomile extract
Sodium lactate
Niacinamide
n-acetyl glucosamine
Propanediol 1,3
Sea kelp bioferment

Oh, as a note, if you're a $10 subscriber to my Patreon page, Lotioncrafter is offering you a 7% discount on ingredients until Saturday, June 10th! Pretty awesome, eh?

See you tomorrow!
Continue Reading

Recipes from the 2017 HSCG conference: Gigawhite & Vitamin C moisturizer with Aristoflex AVC – the active ingredients and recipe

On Monday, we took a look at the oil phase and emulsifier for this recipe. Yesterday, we took a look at the water phase and preservative. Today, let's take a look at the active ingredient and the final recipe.

I’m adding Alpaflor® Gigawhite (INCI: Water, Glycerin, Alcohol, Malva Sylvestris (Mallow) Extract, Mentha Piperita (Peppermint) Leaf Extract, Primula Veris Extract, Alchemilla Vulgaris Extract, Veronica Officinalis Extract, Melissa Officinalis Leaf Extract, Achillea Millefolium Extract), an ECOcert extract. It can be used at 3% to 5% to help promote a more even skin tone and uniform complexion in all over products or targeted treatments.

This ingredient can decrease the viscosity of Aristoflex AVC a titch, but it's not a big deal as the recipe is thick enough.

Please note, it is important to make this recipe in the order you see below. If you change an ingredient, figure out in which phase you should include it before starting the process. I know it seems silly, but it can make such a difference in the viscosity of the final product.

GIGAWHITE & VITAMIN C MOISTURIZER
WATER SOLUBLE INGREDIENTS
80.5% distilled water
2% sea kelp bioferment
2% panthenol (powder)
0.5% allantoin

ACTIVE INGREDIENTS
3% propanediol 1,3
0.5% resveratrol
5% Alpaflor Gigawhite

OIL SOLUBLE INGREDIENTS
2% tetrahexyldecyl ascorbate
3% squalane

EMULSIFIER
1% Aristoflex AVC

PRESERVATIVE
0.5% liquid Germall Plus

1. Measure the slightly heated distilled or de-ionized water into a container. 
2. Add your water soluble ingredients. 
3. Mix the propanediol 1,3 with the resveratrol into a small container, like a shot glass. When dissolved, add to the larger container along with Gigawhite.
4. Add the oil soluble ingredients. 
5. Add the Aristoflex AVC. 
6. Add the preservative. 
7. Mix well. Bottle, and rejoice! 

Pretty simple, eh? If you're organized and can gather your ingredients quickly, it takes no more than 10 minutes to make a completely emulsified lotion! 

Links to buy this ingredient from Lotioncrafter: Alpaflor® Gigawhite

As a note, none of these links are affiliate links and I do not receive any sort of compensation if you buy something from Lotioncrafter. I provide them as Jen was so kind to supply all the ingredients for the conference at great expense to her company, and this is my way of saying thanks for spending so much time to make sure my presentation was the best it could be! 

Join me tomorrow as we take a look at the niacinamide & willow bark oil free hydro-gel. 
Continue Reading

Recipes from the 2017 HSCG conference: Gigawhite & Vitamin C moisturizer with Aristoflex AVC – the water phase

We took a look at the oil phase and emulsifier in this recipe yesterday. Let's take a look at the water phase today. Because I can only use around 5% oils in this recipe, it's even more important to choose our water phase carefully to include ingredients that will hydrate our skin.

I’m adding resveratrol in this recipe at 0.5% to help with hyperpigmentation and signs of photoaging. It has a ton of great qualities: It's a very good anti-oxidant and free radical scavenger, as well as being a great anti-inflammatory. It's advertised as reducing he signs of aging by ameliorating the effects of skin damage caused by UVB rays. And it is showing promise for diabetic wound care as it's shown some anti-bacterial and anti-fungal activity.

Related posts:
Cosmeceuticals: Resveratrol
Aristoflex AVC: A light lotion with resveratrol, panthenol, and allantoin

To include resveratrol, we need to first mix it with a solvent like propylene glycol. I've chosen to use propanediol 1,3 as the solvent in this recipe. Mix the two together first, then add to the product.

What's up with propanediol 1,3? It's a naturally derived substitute for propylene glycol that can be used at up to 20% in your water phase. It's a humectant that draws water from the atmosphere to your skin to offer hydration. It has a 9 to 12 month shelf life once opened.

I can't use hydrolyzed proteins with Aristoflex AVC as it will ruin the viscosity, so I'm using sea kelp bioferment as the film former and oil free emollient. We generally use it at 2% to 5%, but I find the lower amount is enough for this recipe.

If you've been around this blog for even a short period of time, you'll know I love allantoin! This water soluble powder is a fantastic skin protectant that softens skin (it's a keratolytic, meaning it causes the keratin to soften), causes rapid cell regeneration and proliferation, and is approved by the FDA to temporarily prevent and protect chafed, chapped, cracked, or windburned skin by speeding up the natural processes of the skin and increasing the water content. It can be derived from comfrey root, aloe vera, and urine. I know there's some debate about whether to add this to the heated water phase or the cool down phase, and I suggest using at no more than 0.5% in slightly warmed water. Why? Because it seems to dissolve better in warmed water and it avoids those awful shards that can come when the ingredient crystallizes as it cools.

You also know I'm a big fan of panthenol. What can it do? It improves stratum corneum hydration, reduces redness and inflammation, increases wound healing by stimulating skin epithelialization, improves skin barrier mechanism repair, mitigates itching and soothes irritation, and behaves as a humectant. You don't need much to get these effects - 2% is more than enough.

You can find it as a powder or liquid. The powder should be used in the heated water phase, the liquid in the cool down phase.

For my preservative, I'm choosing to use 0.5% liquid Germall Plus. It's my go-to as it's a broad spectrum preservative that works well with all kinds of different emulsifiers and at different pH levels.

Links to buy these ingredients at Lotioncrafter:
Resveratrol
Propanediol 1,3
Sea kelp bioferment
Allantoin
dl-Panthenol
Liquid Germall Plus 

As a note, none of these links are affiliate links and I do not receive any sort of compensation if you buy something from Lotioncrafter. I provide them as Jen was so kind to supply all the ingredients for the conference at great expense to her company, and this is my way of saying thanks for spending so much time to make sure my presentation was the best it could be! 

As this post is also getting too long - yeah, I know, I talk too much! - join me tomorrow as we take a look at the active ingredient, Gigawhite, and the final recipe.
Continue Reading